About Us

John Lorenz and Scott Cooper formed FractureStudies to provide information, support and solutions to the energy industry and research organizations. We utilize our 45+ years of combined international experience in fracture analysis to achieve our mission of providing timely analyses of your fractured reservoir system.

John C. Lorenz - Certified Petroleum Geologist

I earned my undergraduate degree, majoring in geology and anthropology, from Oberlin College in 1972, after which my wife dragged me off to Morocco to teach English and learn Arabic with the Peace Corps. In Morocco, I ran into a group of geologists from the University of South Carolina, and hooked up with them to do an M.Sc. on a Moroccan Triassic rift basin. I worked for the USGS in Louisiana and New Mexico from 1975 to 1977, which drove me back to school, where I worked on the Nubian Sandstone in Libya and Cretaceous strata in Montana and earned a PhD from Princeton University in 1981. I joined Sandia National Laboratories in 1981 to be the geologist for the tight gas Multiwell Experiment in the Piceance basin, where I invented the internet and discovered natural fractures. I worked for Sandia Labs from 1981 to 2007, doing fractured-reservoir studies in exotic places such as Alaska, Algeria, and Texas. During that time, I was conned into being the AAPG Elected Editor from 2001-2004. I left Sandia in March of 2007 to work as a consultant. More recently I served as president of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists from 7/1/09 to 6/30/10. As president, I supported the advancement of the geosciences and their applications to hydrocarbon-related problems.

My published papers on natural and induced fractures in reservoirs range geographically from the Lisburne Limestone in Alaska to the Spraberry Formation in Texas to the Nubian Sandstone in Libya. These papers and presentations have been awarded the AAPG Levorsen and Jules Braunstein awards. I have worked closely with the oil and gas industry on problems involving reservoir dimensions and in situ permeability, gaining extensive hands-on experience with core analysis and fieldwork which provides regular doses of reality. I have led field trips, presented core workshops, and taught short courses for the industry-oriented geological community. My work has been practical, aimed at improving the understanding of fractured reservoirs and permeability in order to enhance fluid extraction. I have also addressed the problems of determining the dimensions of reservoirs deposited in fluvial environments, and ferried new-purchase aircraft across the US in both directions.

John C. Lorenz: Resume (downloadable pdf format)

Education

  • 1981, Ph.D., Geology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
  • 1975, M.Sc., Geology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
  • 1972, B.A, double major, Geology and Anthropology, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio

Experience

  • 2007-present, Consultant, Geoflight LLC, Edgewood, NM
  • 1981-2007, Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • 1975-1977, Geologist, US Geological Survey, Metairie, Louisiana, and Roswell, New Mexico
  • 1972, Volunteer, Peace Corps Morocco, Casablanca, Morocco

Memberships

  • American Association of Petroleum Geologists
  • Albuquerque Geological Society
  • Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists
  • Society of Petroleum Engineers
  • Civil Air Patrol

Publications
Numerous publications, including one book, on sedimentology, natural fractures, and reservoir characterization, as well as articles on general aviation (see accompanying publications list).

Associations
Associate with the Rock Deformation Research group at the University of Leeds, Leeds, UK (www.rdr.leeds.ac.uk/), and with the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute at the University of Wyoming (www.eori.uwyo.edu/) since 2007. Previously adjunct professor at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology.

Other Interests

  • American Association of Petroleum Geologists President, 2009-2010
  • American Association of Petroleum Geologists Elected Editor 2001-2004
  • Fluvial sedimentology (See publications list)
  • Flight instruction (Private, Instrument, Commercial, Tailwheel, Mountain checkouts, High Performance, Complex, and Multi-engine (see also articles authored in the Southwest Aviator, www.swaviator.com)

Contact
John C. Lorenz
john@fracturestudies.com
Phone: (505) 281-9321
Fax: (505) 286-9467

Mailing Address:
FractureStudies
99 Rainbow Road
Suite 4-5
Edgewood, NM 87015-2348

Scott P. Cooper

I was raised in the Black Hills of South Dakota and had an early career in tourism, aquaculture (specifically raising rainbow trout) and ranching. I obtained a B.Sc. in geology from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 1997 with an undergraduate thesis/study of rhyolite dikes within the Homestake Gold Mine in Lead, South Dakota. Obtained a M.S. in geology from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (New Mexico Tech) with a thesis topic of “Deformation within a Basement-Cored Anticline: Teapot Dome, Wyoming”. My thesis advisor was Dr. Laurel Goodwin. Dr. John Lorenz at Sandia National Laboratories provided invaluable support throughout my graduate work and provided an opportunity to start at Sandia Labs as a student intern. I advanced to be a Senior Member of the Technical Staff and worked on a variety of projects related to outcrop and subsurface fracture studies, CO2 sequestration, geothermal energy, and other resource and national security related issues.

In the summer of 2008, I took a leap of faith and left the relative safety of Sandia to start my own consulting company. Since then I have had fun working with Dr. Lorenz and industry personnel on naturally fractured reservoir systems. I have two sons, Sean and Ryan. Like most - if not all husbands, I have a wife who is significantly smarter than I am; Karen has a Ph.D. in biomedical science and toxicology and works at the University of New Mexico. I am a volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America and currently live in the mountains east of Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Scott P. Cooper: Resume (downloadable pdf format)

Education

  • 2000, M.Sc., Geology, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Advisor: Dr. Laurel Goodwin; Thesis: Deformation within a Basement-Cored Anticline: Teapot Dome, Wyoming
  • 1997, B.Sc., Geology, 1997, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Graduated with Highest Honors, Advisors: Dr. Alvis Lisenbee and Dr. James Fox; Senior Thesis: Gas/Fluid Evolution and the Formation of Rhyolite Dike Associated Breccia Margins at the Homestake Gold Mine, Lead, SD

Experience

  • 2008-present, Cooper Geological Consulting LLC, geologic studies of fractured reservoir systems
  • 1999-2008, Senior Member of Technical Staff: Sandia National Laboratories, Geophysical Technology Department,
  • 1997-2000, Research Assistant: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology,
  • 1995, Teaching Assistant: South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Dr. Ashworth
  • 1993, Research Assistant: South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Dr. Islam & Dr. Cheema, Hydrologic fluid-flow modeling of fractured carbonates
  • 1979-1992, Manager, assistant manager and all around ranch hand, Crystal Cave Park Inc., Trout Haven and Trout Haven Ranch

Memberships

  • American Association of Petroleum Geologists
  • Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists
  • Wyoming Geological Association

Publications
Numerous publications related to natural fractures, deformation bands and reservoir characterization (see accompanying publications list).

Associations
Associate with the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute at the University of Wyoming (www.eori.uwyo.edu/).

Other Interests
Boy Scouts of America, trout wrangling, long-distance trucking (CDL), ranching

Contact
Scott P. Cooper
scott@fracturestudies.com
Phone: (505) 286-1462

Mailing Address:
FractureStudies
99 Rainbow Road
Suite 4-5
Edgewood, NM 87015-2348

 

 

 

photo
Fractures related to folding and variations therein by lithology are a specialty.

phto
Large-scale fracture initiated in the subsurface but opening recently due to gravity and slumping into canyon visible at top of photograph.

phtoFractures provide preferential flow pathways and cause leakage around dams.

photoJohn Lorenz putting natural fractures into a local and regional framework under the blazing sun and wondering if it is lunchtime yet.

photo Which of these fractures (if any) are important for your reservoir?